The Maryland Psychiatric Research Center (MPRC) is dedicated to providing treatment to patients with schizophrenia and related disorders, educating professionals and consumers about schizophrenia, and conducting basic and translational research into the manifestations, causes, and treatment of schizophrenia.

The MPRC is a division of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and operates as a joint program with the State of Maryland Behavioral Health Administration and the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

The Maryland Early Intervention Program (EIP) is a collaborative for the early identification and treatment of mental illness and psychosis and offers specialized programs with expertise in the early identification, evaluation and comprehensive psychiatric treatment of adolescents and young adults at risk for, or in the early stages of, a mental illness with psychosis. To get more information, request education, make referrals, or request consultations, please contact: (877) 277-MEIP (6347) info@MarylandEIP.com www.MarylandEIP.com

Schizophrenia is a chronic brain disorder that affects people in many ways. Because it is complex, researchers must develop and test treatments that look at a wide range of symptoms. The goal of these MPRC research studies is to find better treatment and medication for schizophrenia and related disorders.

The following studies are active and currently enrolling participants. If you participate there is no cost to join and you will be paid for your time and travel.

New Treatment Studies:

    CIDAR Study: The purpose of this study is to examine two possible treatments for symptoms of schizophrenia including difficulty in talking to people, enjoying activities, and problems with attention, learning, and memory. The two medication treatments are Oxytocin and Galantamine.
    DAAMSEL Study: The purpose of this study is to test whether a low dose of an antipsychotic medication called aripiprazole may help improve the symptoms of high prolactin levels, which includes sexual dysfunction, problems with menstruation, and the slow loss of bone thickness. Aripiprazole has also been shown to be helpful for improving symptoms of schizophrenia.
    Pet Imaging and Schizophrenia: The purpose of this study is to understand how genes affect thefunction of a chemical system in the brain in people with and without schizophrenia.
    Social Affiliation: The purpose of this study is to address treatment for some symptoms of Schizophrenia such as reduced motivation and the reduced ability to feel or express emotions. Some individuals who have relatives with Schizophrenia may experience these symptoms as well. This study will examine the effects of a drug called Oxytocin, on such symptoms that may be present in family members of those with Schizophrenia.
    Sensitivity to Gluten: The purpose of this study is to look at the ease or difficulty in following a gluten-free diet for individuals with Schizophrenia who have sensitivity to gluten or are diagnosed with Celiac Disease.
    VISTA Study: The purpose of this study is to determine if the antiviral drug, valacyclovir, improves cognitive functioning and symptoms in early course schizophrenia.

Non- Medication Studies:

    Agranulocytosis: The purpose of this study is to look for genes which may increase the risk of agranulocytosis, which means having a low white blood cell count while being treated with Clozapine.
    Attention and Working Memory in People with Schizophrenia: The purpose of this study is to better understand the problems that people with schizophrenia have with concentration, memory, and problem-solving
    Decision Making in People with Schizophrenia: The purpose of this study is to better understand the problems that people with schizophrenia have with concentration, memory, and problem-solving.

If you are interested in participating in a study, please call 410-402-7666 or visit www.mprc.umaryland.edu/schizophrenia.asp for more information.